Sunday, August 3, 2014

1965 Bills Defensive Back Profiles

BOOKER EDGERSON
Cornerback
No. 24
Western Illinois
Booker has done his part to make the Buffalo defensive secondary provide ever-improving protection from opposing passing attacks. As a 1962 rookie, his six interceptions were 10th in the AFL, his 111 yards on interception returns were ninth, and his 40-yard return was the ninth longest in the league that year.
Last season, Booker's four interceptions were returned 130 yards, eighth in the league, and his 91-yard return was the AFl's second best.


BUTCH BYRD
Cornerback
No. 42
Boston University
Possessing outstanding speed and an instinct for staying with elusive receivers, Butch played all 14 games of his rookie season and was selected to the Pro Bowl.
Last September 26 in War Memorial Stadium against defending AFL champion San Diego, Butch's interception return for 85 yards and a touchdown in the first quarter was the first score in a game won by the Bills 30-3. The victory lifted Buffalo to a 3-0 seasonal record and a tie for first with Boston in the AFL East.


CHARLEY WARNER
Cornerback-Kick Returner
No. 22
Prairie View
After playing all 14 games for Kansas City in 1963, Charley was acquired midway through last season. His 12 punt returns were eighth in the league, his 165 yards in punt returns were sixth, and his longest of 40 yards was seventh-best. Also a good man for kickoff returns, his 12 for 301 yards and a 25.1 average included a long of 44 yards.
A more than capable cornerback, Charley intercepted a pass for his new team and returned it 30 yards.


GEORGE SAIMES
Safety
No. 26
Michigan State
"George Saimes has made the conversion from All-America running back (at Michigan State) to All-AFL as a defensive safetyman. And the transition took him only two seasons. George plays the weak side safety. Thus, he's called upon to guard the split end.
At 5-10, he gives away a lot of height, yet he gets the job done. He intercepted six passes last year and he returned them for 56 yards.
He's a solid if unspectacular player."

-Jack Zanger, Pro Football 1965

"Even though he had been a consensus All-American at Michigan State, and the most valuable Spartan player for two years, George Saimes didn't shape up as much of a pro prospect. He stood a mere 5-10 and weighed just 185, hardly the ideal specifications for offense. However, coach Duffy Daugherty had called Saimes 'a complete football player,' so Buffalo was willing to give him a shot.
Although he had been noted for his ability as a runner, the Bills decided to see how well George could track down a ball thrown by an opposing quarterback. He learned his lessons as a defender so well that he made the starting lineup in the third game of his rookie season.
Last year, his second with Buffalo, George was the big reason that the Bills were so vastly improved on pass defense. If didn't take long for him to build a reputation as one of the best 'play readers' in the league. Almost immediately after assuming his safety role, he reacted naturally to breaking down pass patterns and getting to the right spot at the proper time. There's no doubt he'll do it again this season."

-Sports All-Stars/1965 Pro Football

"Originally drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs, George has been called 'a defensive stickout' by several coaches. He has been a regular ever since joining Buffalo.
In his rookie campaign in 1963, George began his career with the Bills as a running back. In college, he was a consensus All-America halfback and was twice voted Michigan State's Most Valuable Player."

-1965 Topps No. 39


HAGOOD CLARKE
Safety
No. 45
Florida
Hagood returned 33 punts as a rookie, most in the AFL, for 317 yards, second in the league, and a 9.6 average, third, including his long of 53 yards, fourth in the AFL.
In the third game of the season last year at home against the defending AFL champion San Diego Chargers, with Buffalo leading 7-3 in the second quarter, Hagood returned a punt 53 yards for a touchdown. The PAT gave the Bills a 14-3 halftime lead in a game they eventually won 30-3.

No comments:

Post a Comment